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By: Kevin Neff, www.KevinMakesSense.com

As more and more businesses turn to Email marketing, consumers are waking up with their coffee and Email inboxes flooded with messages. Some they want, and many they don’t, (sound familiar?). Here are my five tips to help your Emails cut through the “clutter” and become more deliverable.

  1. It All Starts With Your List—Are you one of those people that collects business cards and views them as an open invitation to put them in your Email subscription database? Well DON’T! Make sure that people “opt-in” to receive your Emails. By doing this it ensures that your message is reaching those who want it, but most importantly, those who expect it. This can be accomplished by links off your website, text-to-join, sign-up sheets at your events, even QR codes. Make sure to be clear and don’t do the “small print at the bottom of the page” routine where they think that they are signing up for something else—you will only hurt yourself, and your results. Forcing your message down someone’s throat will never get you the positive results that you are hoping for!
  2. The Subject Line 2-2-2 Philosophy—Probably the single most important element of getting your Email opened is the subject line. Surprisingly, it is probably the one thing that most spend the least amount of  thought on. Try incorporating the 2-2-2 principle of thought. The first “2” is for the two seconds you typically have for someone to pay attention. The second “2” if for the first two words of your subject line. That’s really all they read before making a decision whether to go any further (you know it’s true). It’s not a decision about whether to read your message, but as to whether or not they will bother to even read the rest of your subject line. The third “2” is for “why does this Email or message right now?” If you can answer that question in your subject line or headline, as close to the first two words as possible, more people will stop and at least open your message.
  3. Deliver On Their Expectations—Ok, so now that you have them signed up, what are you going to deliver to them? Well, how about what you told them that made them want to opt-in the first place? (What a novel idea). If your description was a “non-selling,” information-only newsletter, then guess what, DON’T send out constant solicitations. They subscribed based on the information you gave them, so deliver on it. Don’t  fill their inbox up with endless emails trying to sell your product(s). They have expectations on what you promised you would provide them, so do it. By doing this it will help you to remain “relevant” in their minds, and when they are in need of what it is you have to offer.
  4. It’s Quality, NOT Quantity—Another common mistake is to constantly blast subscribers with messages. While I know that some subscribe to the “it’s a numbers game” theory, I am more concerned with the quality of the activity from the Email sent, not the number of Emails I am sending. Most Email marketing providers now have tracking features that you can take advantage of so that you can see the results—or lack thereof—for your campaigns. An example of this is shown in an Email marketing case study that we did. For a copy of the results you can go to www.kevinmakessense.com.
  5. Always Leave Them Wanting More—So many people want to write “War & Peace” in an Email. You don’t need to impress them with your knowledge of everything in the universe in one Email. In addition, most people are now opening Email on their mobile devices so make your sure to give them bits of great information at a time that is easily and quickly accessed. Not only will you get better response, you will always leave them wanting more, and that will help to keep your retention numbers high!

We incorporate these tips and achieve open rates that are above industry averages for all of our Email marketing client campaigns, and so can you!

Kevin Neff is the founder of the KPN Group, creator of “Blunt Force Trauma Marketing,” and co-author of the best seller “The Secret to Winning Big.”

For more performance marketing stories and exclusive content, make sure to like TheMail on Facebook, follow on Twitter, subscribe on YouTube, and sign up for our Email newsletter.

Murray Newlands

Murray Newlands is an online marketing industry veteran, and the founder of TheMail.

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the mail online
Murray Newlands

Murray Newlands

Murray Newlands is an online marketing industry veteran, and the founder of TheMail.

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